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Fantastic Five Steps for Healthy Kidneys





The key is to find kidney disease before the trouble starts. Regular testing for everyone is important, but it is especially important for people at risk.


STEP 1: KNOW THESE FACTS


6 Things Healthy Kidneys Do:



8 Problems Kidney Disease Can Cause:



STEP 2: ASSESS YOUR RISK


5 Main Risk Factors:



Obesity


6 Additional Risk Factors:



STEP 3: RECOGNIZE SYMPTOMS


8 Possible Trouble Signs:


Most people with early kidney disease have no symptoms, which is why early detection is critical. By the time symptoms appear, kidney disease may be advanced, and symptoms can be misleading. Pay attention to these:



STEP 4: GET TESTED


If you or a loved one belongs to a high-risk group, ask your primary-care physician about these tests—and be especially insistent about the last one. Your doctor may want to perform other tests as well.


 3 Simple, Life-saving Tests:


1. Blood Pressure (BP test)


High blood pressure can damage small blood vessels (glomeruli) in the kidneys. It is the second-leading cause of kidney failure after diabetes.


Good Score: Below 140/90 is good for most people. Below 130/80 is better if you have chronic kidney disease. Below 120/80 is considered best. Check with your healthcare team to see what is right for you.


2. Protein in Urine (urine test)


Traces of a type of protein, albumin, in the urine (albuminuria) may be an early sign of kidney disease. Regular amounts of albumin and other proteins in the urine (proteinuria) indicate kidney damage.


Good Score: Less than 30 mg of albumin per gram of urinary creatinine (a normal waste product)


3. Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) (blood test)


This measures how well the kidneys are filtering the blood. Doctors measure blood creatinine levels and perform a calculation based on age, race, and gender.


Good Score: Over 90 is good. 60-89 should be monitored. Less than 60 for 3 months indicates kidney disease.


STEP 5: STAY HEALTHY


6 Things People with Kidney Disease Should Do:



9 Things Everyone Should Do:





Content source: Worldkidney.org